Developing Activities by Discipline

Hillsborough County Arts in Education Program

Dance | Music | Theater | Visual Arts

Questions for Cognitive Level I

Always require students to explain their answers using details and supporting facts.

Identify and recall:

Who…? What…? When…? Where…? How…?

  • Describe…
  • List…
  • Label…

Comprehend:

Retell…in your own words

  • What was the main idea of…
  • Describe how or why…

Apply information:

  • How is…and example of …?
  • How is…related to…?
  • Why is…significant?

Dance | Music | Theater | Visual Arts

Developing Activities by Discipline – Dance

ACTIVITIES FOR DANCE PERFORMANCES: TRADITIONAL, MODERN, FOLK, MULTICULTURAL
Cognitive Level I

Read the story the performance is based on, or read the background information provided in the associated study guide on the style of dance.

  • Name the style(s) of dance or cultural influences you saw on the field trip.
  • List all the characters in the dance story and the story setting.

Describe the programming. Were there solo dances, small groups, or did the whole group perform together?

  • Explain how the costumes and/or scenery contributed to the dance performance.
  • Discuss how the blocking, or positioning of the dancers on the stage, affected the performance.
  • Discuss how the music contributed to the performance of the dancers.

Draw a picture of your favorite dancer or dance scene.

  • Illustrate or make a diorama of a scene from the performance.
  • Draw a poster to advertise the performance.
  • Demonstrate how a dancer used a specific movement to show emotion.
  • Demonstrate how the dancers might have danced if the stage was made of sticky glue or bouncy rubber.
  • Use a map and/or timeline to locate information about a cultural region or dance style.

ACTIVITIES FOR DANCE PERFORMANCES: TRADITIONAL, MODERN, FOLK, MULTICULTURAL
Cognitive Level II

Create a graph that records performance data such as: female/male dancers, or happy/sad dances, etc.

  • Use a Venn Diagram to compare/contrast two of the dances.

Write a narrative story about what might happen if the dancers were asked to perform under water.

  • What if the peanuts in your lunch bag decided to get out and dance during a math lesson? Write a narrative story about these dancing peanuts.
  • Listen to a variety of instrumental music (with no singers or words). Select the music that would best accompany a “Dance of Anger,” “Sleepy Dance,” or “Dance of Joy.”
  • Create your own “Happy Birthday Dance.”

Did you enjoy the performance?

  • Write a persuasive essay convincing a friend to go see this production.
  • Write a letter to the dance company nominating a performer for a “Best Dancer Award.” Explain why your nominee should win the award.
  • Create a rubric to rate the performance. Decide on criteria for judging: Body Control/Dance movements. Technical Precision/Accuracy, Costumes, etc.

Dance | Music | Theater | Visual Arts

Developing Activities by Discipline – Music

ACTIVITIES FOR MUSICAL PERFORMANCES: INSTRUMENTAL, VOCAL, OPERA
Cognitive Level I

Read about the group or the performance medium for your field trip in the study guide provided.

  • List all the instruments in the performance.
  • Identify the types of voices (soprano, alto, tenor, bass) heard in the performance.

Describe the programming.

  • Were there solos, small groups, or did the whole group always perform together?
  • Discuss how the positioning of the performers on the stage affected the performance.
  • If the music told a story, retell the story in your own words.

Draw a picture of a performer (and/or their instrument).

  • Illustrate or make a diorama of a scene from the performance.
  • Draw a poster to advertise the performance.
  • Use a map and/or timeline to locate historical information about a composer, performer, or style of music.
  • Write 5 questions you would like to ask one of the performers if you could go backstage.

ACTIVITIES FOR MUSICAL PERFORMANCES: INSTRUMENTAL, VOCAL, OPERA
Cognitive Level I I

  • Create a graph that records performance data such as: female/male performers, or adult/youth performers, or fast/slow musical selections, etc.
  • Use a Venn diagram to compare/contrast instrument families (string, woodwinds, brass, percussion) or individual instruments and voices.
  • As the audience watches the musicians perform, a pink bubble begins to stretch from the bell of a clarinet (or any woodwind or brass instrument). Write a narrative story to tell about how the bubble gum got into the instrument and what happened as it gets bigger during the concert.
  • Imagine a new instrument for the string (or woodwind, brass, percussion) family. Design the new instrument and illustrate how it is played.
  • Create new words for the tune “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” that describe performers or events from the field trip performance.
  • Think about the instruments or voices you heard on your field trip. Write an expository essay about your favorite.

Did you enjoy the performance?

  • Write a persuasive essay convincing a friend to go see this production.
  • Write a letter to the production company nominating a performer for a “Best Musician Award.” Explain why your nominee should win the award.
  • Create a rubric to rate the performance. Decide on criteria for judging: Musical Selections Played; Acting/Stage presence; Technical Precision/Accuracy; Overall Performance, etc.

Dance | Music | Theater | Visual Arts

Developing Activities by Discipline – Theater

ACTIVITIES FOR STAGE PRODUCTIONS: PLAYS, PUPPET THEATRE, STORYTELLERS, MIMES
Cognitive Level I

Read the story (or play) your field trip performance is based on.

  • Name the main character.
  • List all the characters.
  • Identify the setting.
  • List the story events in the order they happened.
  • Describe a character (or setting)
  • Explain the problem (or conflict) in the story.
  • Explain how the actors used stage props to tell the story (or develop characterization).
  • Discuss how the blocking, or positioning of the actors on stage, affected the performance.
  • Discuss how unusual technical elements (light, shadow, sound, etc.) were used in the performance.
  • Retell the story in your own words.

Draw a picture of a character.

  • Illustrate or make a diorama of a scene from the performance.
  • Draw a poster to advertise the performance.
  • Work with other students to act out a scene.
  • Demonstrate how an actor used facial expression to show emotion.
  • Write a narrative story to summarize the plot of the performance story.
  • Use a map and/or timeline to locate the setting of the story.
  • Make a mobile showing events in the story.

ACTIVITIES FOR STAGE PRODUCTIONS: PLAYS, PUPPET THEATRE, STORYTELLERS, MIMES
Cognitive Level II

Would the main character make a good friend?

  • Write an expository essay explaining why or why not
  • Create a graph that records performance data such as: female characters, male characters, animal characters or number of characters in each scene, etc.
  • Compare/contrast a character to someone you know or compare/contrast the setting to a different location or time.

Solve a special effects mystery.

  • Use words or pictures to explain how “special effects” (lighting, smoke, sound effects) were created.
  • Imagine the story in a different time or place.
  • Design sets or costumes for the new setting.

You’re the director.

  • Plan the performance of a scene in your classroom. Include the cast of characters, staging area, and ideas for costumes, scenery, and props in your plan.
  • Create a new ending to the story.

Did you enjoy the performance?

  • Write a persuasive essay convincing a friend to go see this production.
  • Write a letter to the production company nominating a performer for a “Best Actor Award.” Explain why your nominee should win the award.
  • Create a rubric to rate the performance. Decide on criteria for judging: Sets, Costumes, Acting, Lighting, Special Effects, Overall Performance, etc.

Dance | Music | Theater | Visual Arts

Developing Activities by Discipline -Visual Arts

ACTIVITIES FOR VISUAL ARTS & MUSEUM TOURS
Cognitive Level I

Read background information about your field trip art forms.

  • List all the art forms viewed (painting, sculpture, weaving, etc.)
  • During your field trip, record/tally: watercolor paintings, oil/acrylic paintings, stone sculpture, metal sculpture, photography, etc.
  • List the paintings that were abstract in content.

Explain how geometric shapes were used in exhibit pieces.

  • Abstract art uses lines, colors, shapes to share an idea, not a specific subject that you can recognize.
  • Discuss why you think some artists would rather paint abstract art.

Illustrate or make a diorama showing your class at the museum.

  • Draw a poster to advertise your field trip exhibit.
  • Use a map and/or timeline to locate information about an artist, art form, or style of art.

ACTIVITIES FOR VISUAL ARTS & MUSEUM TOURS
Cognitive Level II

Choose one exhibit piece.

  • Describe the way the work is put together in terms of: rhythm, movement, balance, proportion, emphasis, variety, unity, harmony, contrast.
  • Create a graph that records exhibit data such as: number of sculptures, paintings, photographs.
  • Use a Venn diagram to compare/contrast two still-life paintings or painting and sculpture.

If the picture you drew could come to life, what would you draw?

  • Write a narrative story, telling about your picture and what happened when it came to life.

 

A portrait is a picture of a person that shows the person’s face.

  • Think of a portrait you saw on your field trip. Imagine that the person in the portrait writes a letter to your class telling all about their life. Write that letter, including details about the writer and where they live.

Plan and create a still-life drawing using items in your classroom.

  • Think of the feelings that different exhibit pieces brought from you.
  • If you were going to paint something that makes you feel relaxed and peaceful, what would it be.
  • Write an expository essay explaining what you would paint and why.

Dance | Music | Theater | Visual Arts